Is Marvel Sending Out Fake Set Photos for “Avengers 4”?

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(Photo: Marvel)

Marvel’s frankly ridiculous attempt to film “Infinity War” and “Avengers 4” back to back is still ongoing, and a bunch of leaked set photos have been grabbing attention on the internet recently.

We won’t delve too far into these photos for fear of spoilers, but they have raised an interesting question: is Marvel deliberately trying to trick its fans by unleashing fake photos on the world?

Such is a new theory that’s been concocted by a bunch of fans, and you can kind of see the logic behind it.

Source: Marvel

Marvel sets are very rarely all that secure. We all remember the fallout from 2016’s “Spider-Man: Homecoming” filming when a set leak revealed that Zendaya would be playing an approximation of Mary Jane (or MJ) as she’s known in the final film.

Debate raged over that point for almost a year, and Marvel no doubt would have preferred to have greater control over the narrative of that lively discussion.

So, with a movie like “Avengers 4” where everyone is looking for spoilers and where set leaks are inevitable, it makes sense for Marvel to pre-emptively fill everyone’s heads with lies.

If people are speculating over faked set photos, they won’t be looking for real spoilers – at least in theory.

The problem with this plan is that it’s inevitably going to disappoint people who will wait for the entire movie to see what they’ve been promised.

Such is the case with, for example, “Iron Man 2”. A trailer features a cute moment with Tony Stark chatting with Pepper before jumping out of a plane, but this was cut from the final movie.

Similarly, there’s the case of the guy who tried to sue DC over mis-representing “Suicide Squad” by featuring scenes of the Joker in the trailer that didn’t make it into the film.

Then, there’s the most recent similar example: “The Last Jedi”, which has upset many fans for entirely failing to do anything with the Snoke mystery that people had been puzzling over for two years.

Marvel probably isn’t circulating fake set photos, because doing so could potentially hurt the reception for their final movie – especially if the fan theories that grow from their fake photos are more popular than the actual events of the movie.

Besides, quite aside from any genius strategy for keeping secrets, it must be noted that Marvel probably doesn’t have time to set up fake photos just for the sake of confusing their fans.

“Avengers 4” is a fast-paced shoot with lots of different moving parts. There’s no way the studio would waste any effort on taking some fake photos.