Karl-Anthony Towns: ‘I Have the Confidence’ to Be the Best in the World

By 

(Photo: Getty)

Despite winning Rookie of the Year in one of the best ever first seasons in the NBA, Minnesota Timberwolves big man Karl-Anthony Towns isn't ready to call himself a "star."

“I don't look at myself as an NBA star,” Towns told the Courier-Journal. “I'm definitely a player. I've worked hard to make that my title. But I think what the kid learned was always be humble and always enjoy humility. That was great chance for me to instill a good moral value.”

But despite his sky-high humility, Towns' confidence floats at a similar altitude. It's that combination of humble and determined that makes the 20-year-old think he can be the best basketball player in the world.

“I honestly do,” Towns said when asked if he can reach those heights. “I have the confidence in myself. I have everything I think to do it. Now it’s all up to me, to execute. Everyone in the NBA has the ability to do that. We all have the ability to be the best player in the world. Just matters who puts more time and puts more work in and who’s more fortunate enough to make it happen with the right situation. I feel that Minnesota right now gives me one of the best situations in all of the NBA.”

Towns, who was speaking at one of Kentucky coach John Calipari's basketball camps, averaged 18.3 points, 10.5 rebounds, and 1.7 blocks per game in his first season. And he's just one piece to a larger puzzle in Minnesota—including fellow Rookie of the Year Andrew Wiggins, two-time dunk contest champ Zach LaVine, former Chicago Bulls head coach Tom Thibodeau, and No. 5 overall pick Kris Dunn—that has NBA fans preparing to fear the Timberwolves.

The Kentucky alum also took the time to address the thunderous dunk he dropped on five kids at once last week.

“I look back at it now and maybe I went too aggressive, but I told the kid after – he was happy, he was smiling – so one of those things, I'm glad that I was able to give a lot of kids a lot of joy during the camp,” Towns said.

“I don't think anything bad could be taken away from the kid, because I'm an NBA player. He's still a kid, so it's not like he's supposed to jump up and block it. I think it was a great experience. The kid knows why the event happened. I'm glad that he learned from it.”