Ravens Lineman Donates $10K to Medicinal Marijuana Research

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(Photo: Getty)

Add Baltimore Ravens offensive lineman Eugene Monroe to the list of athletes that want to see marijuana used to its full potential as medicinal treatment for athletes and others.

Former NBA All-Star Clifford Robinson does.

College basketball analyst and former 2001 NCAA champion Jay Williams does.

Super Bowl-winning Chicago Bears quarterback Jim McMahon does, too.

Monroe has spent the last week sharing his thoughts on the matter via Twitter …

… culminating in his donating $10,000 to medicinal marijuana research.

Realm of Caring Foundation is an organization aimed at providing health research about marijuana and educating the public about its many uses.

Thankfully, Sports Illustrated compiled Monroe's Tweets into paragraph form (sic):

People all over the country are being HEALED through use of CBD products. Each week during the season NFL teams embrace families of very sick children whom are fighting for their lives. Let’s fund CBD research, as it is continually proven to have a real impact on the lives of those children and their families. 

Some of their symptoms also mimic those NFL players experience. Chronic pain. Traumatic brain injury. With this admittance [Monroe was referring to the league’s admission of a link between football and CTE after decades of denial], let’s be proactive. Let’s research how cannabinoids may help curb traumatic brain injury. If you’re a player and you see this, you better stand up. It’s about damn time. I’m not here advocating smoking weed for recreational purposes. However, smoking weed just may protect your brain. Get over the "stigma" we all know marijuana is not dangerous in any means.

Even our government recognizes marijuana has medical benefits. It’s a shame that Roger Goodell would tell or fans there’s no medical vs recreational distinction. Marijuana is legal is some form whether medical or recreational in each super bowl winners state since 2012. Even Baltimore, with the medical program coming online improving health, wellness and saving lives later this year. 

Concerns about performance? Now that people aren’t AFRAID to speak out, we know our top performing athletes openly admit their use and marijuana’s benefits. Let’s do some #RESEARCH

If I’m a fan, I’m pissed at the time I wasted listening to Goodell lie to me at the Super Bowl. As a player I sure am. We all love the game! Let’s do some #research to protect the players who make it great. If 100 players gave "1,000 for research. Or 200 gave "500, We can get Realm of Caring’s initiative in conjunction with John Hopkins U started. I’m putting a $10,000 dent in it myself. And more if nobody steps up! Fellas, it’s not a lot. Many of you will triple that expense this weekend in Miami. Let’s put our hard earned money towards our health and wellness futures. And that goes for anyone. This isn’t just about athletes. This #research can be profound for everyone.

I’m not here advocating smoking weed for recreational purposes. However, smoking weed just may protect your brain. Get over the "stigma" we all know marijuana is not dangerous in any means.

Even our government recognizes marijuana has medical benefits. It’s a shame that Roger Goodell would tell or fans there’s no medical vs recreational distinction. Marijuana is legal is some form whether medical or recreational in each super bowl winners state since 2012. Even Baltimore, with the medical program coming online improving health, wellness and saving lives later this year. 
Concerns about performance? Now that people aren’t AFRAID to speak out, we know our top performing athletes openly admit their use and marijuana’s benefits. Let’s do some #RESEARCH

Commissioner Roger Goodell said during a Super Bowl 50 press conference that there hasn't been enough research on the positive benefits of marijuana to lift the ban on the substance for players to use it in a medical capacity.

"Our medical professionals look at that," he said. "That is exactly what we talked to them about. I would assume that it would be used in a medical circumstance or if it is even recreational, our medical professionals look at it in both ways and determine whether they think it is in the best interest to do that. Yes, I agree there have been changes, but not significant enough changes that our medical personnel have changed their view. Until they do, then I don’t expect that we will change our view."

Harvard professor Dr. Lester Grinspoon, 87, wrote a letter to Goodell to encourage the NFL to fund research on marijuana's effect on patients with chronic traumatic encephelopathy, or CTE.

“The extensive research required to definitively determine cannabis’s ability to prevent CTE will require millions of dollars in upfront investment,” he wrote in LeafScience.com.  “[I]t’s highly unlikely that a pharmaceutical company will get involved in studying cannabis as a treatment for CTE, because the plant [and its natural components] can’t be patented.”

That was two years ago.

On Tuesday, the NFL admitted a link between head trauma and CTE for the first time ever when Jeff Miller, the NFL's senior vice president for health and safety, was asked by a member of the United States House of Representatives if a link between football and neurodegenerative diseases existed.

"The answer to that question is certainly yes," Miller responded.