The “Fast and Furious” Netflix Cartoon Could Be Better Than the Movies

Matthew Loffhagen
Dreamworks/Netflix
(Photo: Dreamworks/Netflix)

We’re getting a “Fast and Furious” cartoon spin-off series?

Awesome!

Netflix and Dreamworks plan to create a CGI animated series that’s set in the world of the “Fast and Furious” movies.

In classic cartoon spin-off tradition, this show will skew a little younger than the audience for a standard “FF” movie, as the action will follow Dominic Toretto’s young teenage cousin, Tony.

I am so on board for this show!

The “Fast and Furious” movies already function basically like a cartoon. There’s no real attempt at obeying the laws of physics, as cars parachute out of planes, and Dwayne Johnson flexes his muscles to crack open a plaster cast after breaking his arm.

Okay, maybe Johnson really can do that in real life, but that’s beside the point.

With all this over-the-top action at the core of the “Fast and Furious” series, it’s only logical that this will work even better in a wholly CGI endeavor, where the stunts aren’t restricted by the need to include fleshy meatbags at their center.

There’s no need to struggle through the challenges of combining live-action footage with computer generated effects. Now, if the animators can think of it, the story can do it.

I’m excited to see what kind of nonsense the writers manage to come up with for this. I’m imagining something like Netflix’s “Voltron” show, but combined with the quirky charm of a main character that looks like a young Vin Diesel.

One can only hope that Tony Toretto will be built around existing photos from Diesel’s past.

A Noble Tradition

I remember when I was young, my first real introduction to the “James Bond” franchise was a cartoon TV show called “James Bond Jr”.

Despite his name suggesting that he’s Bond’s illegitimate offspring from one of his many dalliances, James Bond Jr is actually the superspy’s nephew, who has to save the world every episode in an elaborate manner.

It’s basically a more outlandish version of the standard “James Bond” adventure formula, minus all the icky romance, because this is for kids.

I have a soft spot in my heart for these kinds of shows. I’m hoping that the “Fast and Furious” Netflix show will end up being every bit as kooky and off-the-wall as one would expect from a classic era Saturday morning cartoon.

After all, it can’t be any dumber than the main series of movies, right?