NFL Teams Don’t Give a Crap About Josh Gordon’s 4 Failed Drug Tests, Still Really Want Him

Bryan Brandom
(Photo: Getty)

Former First-Team All-Pro wide receiver Josh Gordon is still suspended indefinitely after failing his fourth NFL-administered drug test.

And teams don't really seem to care.

According to Bleacher Report's Mike Freeman, teams are already lining up to meet with the suspended Cleveland Browns receiver if and when the league reinstates him:

Two things you hear often in these conversations: First, it seems many teams in football don't see what Gordon has done as deal-breaking. "He's not Greg Hardy," one assistant general manager said.

Second, and not coincidentally, the feeling among some teams is that Gordon could easily in just a year or two be as good as any receiver in football. Remember, he's only 25.

Exactly.

Gordon could fail 100 drug tests for marijuana, and his suspension still shouldn't be as long as individuals found to be violent and dangerous off the field. The fact that front offices are tripping over their wide-legged khakis to sign the wideout while Greg Hardy is practically begging for a job should tell you something about the imbalance in the league's punishment policy—if you can call it that.

And say what you want about his decision-making, but, again, he's 25, with plenty of room to mature—even though the substance detected in his system probably shouldn't even be tested for by the league.

"Josh has been working very hard over the past year to get himself back into the NFL,'' said Drew Rosenhaus, Gordon's agent, to SiriusXMNFL radio (via Cleveland.com). "Obviously there's been a hiccup here. He acknowledged that. But he'll have another opportunity before the season to show the NFL that he's got his life in order and that he's ready to resume his NFL career without any setbacks and I'm very hopeful that he will.''

If Gordon is indeed reinstated, the team that signs him likely won't start with a "C" and end with a "Leveland Browns."

"Once Josh was suspended, we organizationally set our mind frame to not counting on him coming back, and I think that's the only healthy way to operate and the way we continue to look at it,'' Browns executive vice president Sashi Brown said. "And if Josh is fortunate enough to be reinstated, obviously we'll have some discussions with him at that time.''

Brown said Gordon's suspension troubles have had more of an effect on the receiver than the team, which seems to indicate the franchise is less inclined to bring the 2013 receiving yards leader on than other teams might be.

"If anything, probably disappointed for Josh,'' he said. "Organizationally, we're focused on the 65 or so players on our roster right now.''