QUIZ: Take This Quiz to Figure Out If You’ve Got OCD!

We all have our own quirks and at some point in our lives, we’ve all probably joked about having obsessive compulsive disorder. But OCD is definitely not a joke, especially for those who live with an extreme form of this condition. In some cases, OCD will manifest in more obvious ways, like repeatedly performing the same acts like checking to see if the doors are locked or if the gas knobs are off. But there are other lesser-known symptoms you may not be aware of, like suddenly getting worried about being struck by a car when you’re out for a stroll around the neighborhood. Think you may have OCD? Take this quiz and find out.

(Note: This quiz is not meant as an official medical diagnosis.)

We all have our own quirks and at some point in our lives, we’ve all probably joked about having obsessive compulsive disorder. But OCD is definitely not a joke, especially for those who live with an extreme form of this condition. In some cases, OCD will manifest in more obvious ways, like repeatedly performing the same acts like checking to see if the doors are locked or if the gas knobs are off. But there are other lesser-known symptoms you may not be aware of, like suddenly getting worried about being struck by a car when you’re out for a stroll around the neighborhood. Think you may have OCD? Take this quiz and find out.

(Note: This quiz is not meant as an official medical diagnosis.)

Do your feelings and emotions influence the way you live?

  • Yes, all the time
  • Yes, but not often
  • No, never

Many folks with OCD feel like they're chained to their emotions like a prisoner. That's because their feelings run so deep and so high, that any interaction can affect the way they live their lives. For example, a person that is constantly feeling angry and depressed may avoid social encounters and stay in their home to avoid the negative feelings that others bring into their lives.
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Do you have a hard time making yourself feel safe on the inside?

  • Never
  • Yes, sometimes
  • All the time

A person with OCD may feel like they have no control about their own thoughts. Disruptive and intrusive thoughts can ruminate around their heads for days. As a result, they're not able to find any kind of inner peace no matter what they do. And even when they're alone they find it hard to feel safe. Luckily there are anti-anxiety medications, breathing exercises, yoga and meditation techniques that can really make a difference. Talk to your doctor about getting an OCD evaluation. It's never too late to get a hold of your symptoms, and if your doctor isn't listening, keep advocating for yourself and find a new doctor that will listen!
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Do you constantly try to organize your environment but feel uneasy when something doesn't go your way?

  • Yes, sometimes
  • Yes, all the time
  • Never

In a lot of cases, someone with OCD will be very organized, which isn't necessarily a bad thing. But with this condition, the person can become quite agitated if their personal workspace were to become disorganized. For example, say that the person is used to being alone but their new roommate leaves a mess. The person with OCD may feel uneasy as a result and experience what is known in neurodivergent community as a meltdown. Meltdowns are extreme reactions to changes in your environment that can manifest as suddenly crying, having outbursts of anger, or low tolerance to frustration. Sometimes, meltdowns can happen without anyone noticing them.
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Are you worried all the time and does this feeling overwhelm you?

  • Yes, often
  • Yes, but not often
  • Never

Everyone worries every now and then. This is actually pretty normal. But when someone is consumed by worry, they may experience physical symptoms like teeth grinding, nervousness, restlessness, excessive sweat, shortness of breath, among others. Feeling constantly concerned, to the point it's interrupting your life, is unhealthy.
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Do you double check things over and over again until you're confident that everything is alright?

  • Yes
  • Yes, but not always
  • Never

OCD sufferers generally tend to have a pattern of doing things over and over again like checking to make sure that all the doors are locked before going to bed. Even after checking them once, they may go back and check again and again just to be absolutely sure. The person with OCD knows that they just checked all the doors, but they need to assert control of the situation by checking again to see if they're misremembering things. Performing these rituals can help them achieve temporary relief over anxiety.
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Are you scared that harm might come to you or someone you love?

  • Never
  • Yes, sometimes
  • Yes, all the time

Everyone worries about their friends and loved ones at some point or another, especially if they're going through a rough time. But someone with OCD has a warped sense of reality and might envision that someone they love hasn't responded to them because they've been in a horrible car accident or have been assaulted on the street.
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Do you count, organize or touch things when you feel stressed until you feel better?

  • Never
  • Sometimes
  • All the time

People with OCD will touch things, count or even organize stuff when they're feeling stressed. This is a form of mental exercise that puts their mind at ease. They might repeat the process several times until they actually feel better and ignore all other responsibilities like a doctor's appointment or a dinner date with a friend in some extreme cases.
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Do you have terrifying thoughts or concerns that you can't stop thinking about?

  • All the time
  • Sometimes
  • Never

OCD sufferers can experience terrifying thoughts or extreme worry about things they can't control, like the world ending or a loved one being dying in a car accident. They might hear about an impending asteroid passing close to Earth on the news and start obsessing about death. Other times, they can get concerned about something that's closer to home, like being afraid of crashing or running over someone.
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Do you find yourself concerned that your food might be contaminated?

  • Never
  • Sometimes
  • All the time, that's why I can't have leftovers

People can't always control what happens at a restaurant or how a meal is prepared. So, sometimes they have to go on faith that the person preparing the meal will wash their hands repeatedly and wear latex gloves. But someone with OCD will find themselves concerned over the possibility that their food might be contaminated by the time that it gets to them. In some cases, they may even buy the food but choose to throw it away rather than eat it.
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How much does this image bother you?

  • Doesn't bother me
  • It's pretty bothersome
  • It's extremely bothersome

If seeing a bunch of multi-colored plates of different sizes stacked evenly doesn't bother you at all, it's probably because they essentially look absolutely perfect in that they all fit inside each other nice and neat. This could be an indication of OCD. But as usual, make sure to discuss it with your practitioner before jumping to conclusions.
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How much does this image of the uneven tile floors bother you?

  • Doesn't bother me
  • It's somewhat bothersome
  • It's extremely bothersome

This one's a tough one to assess because uneven tile floors can upset anyone, especially when the homeowner has paid for the job to be done right and it's clearly not. However, if a homeowner or renter were to move somewhere where the tiles are already uneven, they probably wouldn't bat an eyelash unless they have OCD.
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Do you insist on symmetry of movement? Like say that you scratched your left knee. Do you also feel the urge to scratch your right knee?

  • Always
  • Sometimes
  • Often

Symmetry of movement can present itself in various ways. But say for example, someone develops an itch on their left knee. They'll immediately scratch that itch until it's gone and move on. But a person with OCD may go the extra mile and scratch their right knee as well, even if it's not itching. This is how people with this condition insist on symmetry of movement.
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Are you obsessed with organization of items in your surrounding area?

  • Never
  • All the time
  • Sometimes

If you find yourself uncomfortable with your surroundings and are constantly trying to organize your cupboard, bookshelves, or desk area so that everything is perfectly symmetrical, you may be displaying signs of OCD. In a lot of cases, people who do this don't realize that they're doing it, but others around them might notice this quirk. So ask your coworkers, family, or partner to see if you're doing this more often than you think.
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Do you walk around your car because you're afraid you might have hit something or someone?

  • Never
  • Sometimes
  • Often

Someone with OCD may stop their car when they hit a bump so they can check and see if they accidentally hit an animal or a person. And to make sure, they'll walk around their car several times and double check under the vehicle to make sure that they didn't injure someone by mistake. The person can clearly see there isn't anything under the car, but they might feel like they need to check again and again. During this process, the fear and anxiety they feel at what they think they've done can be overwhelming.
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Are you extremely superstitious?

  • Yes
  • Sometimes
  • Never

A lot of people are superstitious to a certain degree, but someone with OCD will obsess over silly little superstitions like the fear that they might have bad luck because a black cat crossed their path or because they walked under a ladder. Some people with OCD might think of particular numbers as unlucky, avoid specific colors, or might repeat certain phrases and words in order to prevent something bad from happening. To someone with OCD, just thinking about something happening like a plane crashing is enough to actually make the plane crash.
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Do uncontrollable horrible thoughts cross your mind?

  • Never
  • Sometimes
  • Always

People with OCD may have intrusive thoughts, unpleasant ideas, and involuntary mental patterns that can make them feel uneasy, uncomfortable, disgusted, or could even turn into an obsession. This is one of the reasons why many folks with undiagnosed OCD turn to alcohol or drugs to find some relief from these thoughts. Luckily, a medical assessment and the right medication and coping techniques has proven to be really effective.
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Have you canceled plans because you suffered from anxiety or experienced a panic attack?

  • Never
  • Yes, I've done that
  • Sometimes

Some people with OCD can also experience extreme anxiety. These feelings can be quite debilitating, making it impossible to go to social commitments, finish a career, or stay employed for long. Someone with OCD may get an intense anxiety attack that makes them cancel their plans with their family or friends and stay at home.
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Do you do certain tasks or behaviors over and over again because you're afraid that bad things will happen if you don't?

  • Yes, all the time
  • Never
  • Sometimes

Doing tasks or certain behaviors like scratching a certain part of the body three times or knocking on the door five times are common habits among OCD sufferers. The reason behind their compulsion is their fear that something horrible will happen if they don't do these tasks, like "the world might come to an end" or "someone I love could pass away".
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Do you wash your hands a lot?

  • Sometimes
  • Often
  • Never

Most health experts would agree that washing your hands can be healthy. It's only a concern when you need to do it compulsively or so often that it's interrupting your life or hurting you. This usually includes right before someone's about to sit down to eat breakfast, lunch or dinner or after they've used the bathroom. But someone with OCD will wash their hands repeatedly to the point where their skin becomes irritated and starts to break.
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Are you always feeling sad and irritable?

  • Never
  • Sometimes
  • All the time

People with OCD have a lot on their plate. They could be obsessing about germs, bacteria, diseases, or about someone touching their things. Or they might be afraid that one of their loved ones may die on the way to work. Naturally, someone who's constantly worried will experience feelings of hopelessness and sadness which can sometimes turn into extreme irritability.
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How badly does this image bother you?

  • It's somewhat bothersome
  • It's extremely bothersome
  • It's not bothersome at all

Someone with OCD will not be happy with the way the tiles were placed on this walkway. Admittedly, even someone without OCD would be upset by how hideous this looks. But a person with OCD might find this extremely bothersome. They might even take a sledgehammer to the area to get rid of the tiles and redo the whole project themselves.
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How difficult is it to tolerate uncertainty?

  • Somewhat difficult
  • Not difficult at all
  • Extremely difficult

Someone with OCD will find it extremely difficult to tolerate uncertainty. From their perspective, there is no gray area because there can't be any uncertainty in their lives. If there is, they'll feel like their entire world is in turmoil. They need everything to go as expected and as scheduled and there is no place in their lives for doubt.
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How often do you experience thoughts of losing control and harming yourself or others?

  • All the time, even if I don't act on it
  • Sometimes
  • Never

Generally speaking, everyone has moments in their lives when they get angry at someone or themselves. But a person with OCD may feel worried about losing control, snapping, and hurting themselves or harming other people. These feelings are often accompanied with the fear that they might not be able to come back from their darkness once they have crossed the line.
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Are you always checking to make sure you turned the stove or iron off?

  • Never
  • All the time
  • Sometimes

A person with OCD will be too afraid to leave the house until they're sure that the iron is off. They'll also be unable to sleep if they don't make sure that the stove is off. This may involve going back and checking that the iron or stove is off several times, not just once or every now and then. Some people will even go as far as to touch these appliances to see that they are not hot because they fear that a fire will ignore if they don't.
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Have you ever imagined doing something irrational, like driving your car off of the road?

  • Yes
  • Sometimes
  • Never

It's one thing to get mad at a crowd of protesters or people marching at a parade when one is late for work but can't get through because they're blocking the streets. But some people with OCD may have intrusive thoughts and imagine themselves driving into a crowd of people.
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Have you ever considered acting inappropriately in public?

  • Never
  • All the time
  • Sometimes

None of us is perfect. There are times when we feel like shouting obscenities or acting inappropriately in public. But someone with OCD can consider doing this every time they walk out the door. They may even anticipate a problem in their minds that will mitigate them to act inappropriately moments before they go out.
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Do you avoid situations that can trigger an OCD episode?

  • Sometimes
  • Never
  • All the time

When someone has OCD, it's only a matter of time before they realize that they have it or they are diagnosed with this condition. When that happens, the individual will do their best to avoid situations that can trigger their obsessions like shaking hands because they're disgusted by germs. They may also avoid crowds to avoid having to touch people.
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Do you follow a strict routine?

  • All the time
  • Sometimes
  • Never

Everyone has their own daily rituals and routines such as putting on their face cream at night before going to bed or watching YouTube videos while having breakfast. But someone with OCD will follow a strict routine like going to sleep at a specific time and waking up at a specific time. This will translate to every aspect of their lives and affect their interpersonal relationships, their eating habits, their employment, parenting skills, and other areas of their lives.
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Do you repeat a personal mantra silently in your head?

  • Sometimes
  • Always
  • Never

People with OCD often feel like they're about to crack, so they need something that will center them. To that end, some folks might repeat a personal mantra silently in their heads, especially when they're in the middle of a situation where their OCD might get triggered. This mantra gives them the strength to endure until the negative stimuli is no longer around.
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Is your perfectionism affecting the quality of your life?

  • Never
  • Sometimes
  • Always

There's a difference between perfectionism and OCD. A high achiever might be concerned about the quality of their work, but they don't worry excessively about every little detail to the point that it affects their entire lives. When obsession and compulsion start to affect the quality of life almost to the point where it's impossible to be happy, then it's time to get professional health.
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Do you have family members who have OCD?

  • Yes
  • No
  • Not Sure

Although specific genes haven't been identified, OCD may have a genetic component that affects a person's natural chemistry or brain function. So, having family members that suffer from this condition increases the odds of developing OCD. But therapists believe that OCD can also be learned from watching these family members behave with obsessive fears and compulsion.
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Did you experience any stressful life events?

  • Not yet
  • Never
  • Yes

Although some people have had OCD practically their entire life, others may develop this condition after a stressful life event such as an accident, loss of a loved one, or assault. As a result, people who endured a stressful event have an increased risk of developing OCD. And whenever something triggers the memory of that traumatic event, OCD characteristics may surface.
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Do you have an uncontrollable fear of making mistakes all the time?

  • Extremely fearful
  • Somewhat fearful
  • Rarely fearful

There are many reasons why OCD sufferers do repetitive things. One of those reasons is their fear of making mistakes. They're concerned that even the slightest oversight will result in failure, so they not only double check but triple check and quadruple check. But no matter how many times they check, there's this little voice in their head that tells them that there's probably something that they miss.
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Do you collect or hoard things?

  • Sometimes
  • All the time
  • Never

Although OCD sufferers are mostly known as being super clean and organized, they can also collect or hoard things. This doesn't mean that there's anything wrong with collecting action figures or fancy beer bottles. But someone with OCD will take things further like collecting every newspaper and magazine until it eventually takes up every space in their apartment or home and leaves them living in a pile of stuff or financially ruined.
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Do you often make repeated sudden movements or sounds?

  • Yes
  • No
  • Sometimes

The act of making repeated sudden movements or sounds are called tics. This is often used to describe people who will twitch for no apparent reason at all and will do so repeatedly like excessive winking. They may even make sounds with their mouths or tap their fingers repeatedly on the table. This is common in about one-third of people with OCD.
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Do you get fantasy and reality confused?

  • Never
  • Sometimes
  • Always

Everyone likes to take a little mental vacation and drift off into Lalaland every now and then. That's actually pretty common. But people with OCD will mentally escape into their fantasy almost to the point where they dissociate from reality even when they're not supposed to. As a result, they will find themselves getting fantasy and reality completely mixed up. They may also rely on their imagination instead of common sense or sensory perceptions.
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Do you keep intrusive thoughts to yourself?

  • All the time
  • Sometimes
  • Never

People with OCD experience all kinds of intrusive thoughts that are disruptive to their everyday lives. But they often think that they can control it themselves so they don't tell anyone what they're really going through because they feel ashamed or even guilty, especially when they develop obsessive thoughts related to harming themselves or others.
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Do you find that suppressing intrusive thoughts is an impossible task?

  • Sometimes
  • Never
  • All the time

OCD sufferers experience urges, mental images and persistent thoughts that they will do whatever it takes to try to suppress to keep them from disrupting their lives. But unfortunately, these people come to the conclusion that they are unable to control these thoughts. In fact, the more they try to ignore or suppress their obsessive thoughts, the stronger they become.
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Do you get upset if other people touch things that you arranged?

  • Moderately
  • A lot
  • A little bit

It's one thing to obsess about putting things in a specific order, but people with OCD may get very upset if other people touch their things. This anger can increase if the person doesn't put the item or items back in the order that they were in before. Now some people are territorial by nature and don't have OCD, but someone with this condition will feel extra sensitive about people touching their things.
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Do you believe that there are good and bad numbers?

  • Moderately
  • Not at all
  • A lot

Some people with OCD believe that there are such things as good and bad numbers. This goes beyond the common notion that 7 is a lucky number and 13 is bad luck. These folks will actually experience a panic attack if they're counting an object that happens to land on a bad number. When this happens, they'll take steps to ensure that the particular bad number doesn't occur again.
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Which of these shapes is different?

  • The lightning bolt in the middle
  • The lightning bolt on the left
  • The lightning bolt on the right

Although all three lightning bolts are the same shape and sizes, a person with OCD will detect a difference with the bolt in the middle. At a glance, there doesn't seem to be anything amiss, but the bolt in the middle is actually elevated a bit higher than the bolts on the left and right.
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How much does this image bother you?

  • Doesn't bother me at all
  • It's somewhat bothersome
  • It's extremely bothersome

Although the cartons of Tropicana brand juices appear to have been organized by a perfectionist, there's something that could send an OCD sufferer spiraling. Admittedly, all the flavors are together, but the label on top of this counter reads "Juicy Bacon." Most customers wouldn't bat an eyelash if they saw this. Someone might even find this mistake funny. But someone with OCD may find this mislabeled counter extremely bothersome.
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How much does this image bother you?

  • It's extremely bothersome
  • Doesn't bother me at all
  • It's quite bothersome

Obviously, the person that hung that frame up wasn't thinking when they placed it there, but what's done is done. Someone with OCD, though, might insist on adjusting the frame so that it's centered perfectly in the white column between the two yellow columns. They won't be able to get a wink of sleep until this decorative fail is fixed.
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How much does this image bother you?

  • It's somewhat bothersome
  • It's extremely bothersome
  • It's not bothersome at all

Most people wouldn't notice any difference between the 24 pencils inside this package. But someone with OCD will quickly point out that one of the pencils was placed inside the package upside down. As a result, they may choose to put back this set of 24 pencils and look for another package that doesn't have this defect or they might just leave the store.
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How much does this image bother you?

  • It's extremely bothersome
  • It's somewhat bothersome
  • It's not bothersome at all

There are lines that indicate where each pie piece should get sliced and yet the person holding the knife has decided to ignore them and cut one slice unevenly. At the end of the day, a piece of pie is a piece of pie. It doesn't matter how it gets cut, but OCD sufferers will find that this image brings chaos to their orderly universe.
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How often do you ask for reassurance?

  • Sometimes
  • All the time
  • Rarely

Everyone could use a compliment every now and then, but OCD sufferers may require constant reassurance that they are doing their job correctly. Others may need repeated reassurances that everything is going to be okay in light of a stressful situation. Then again, there are different types of OCD, so this situation may not apply to everyone who has this condition.
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Do you use neutralizing thoughts to counter obsessive thoughts?

  • Never
  • Rarely
  • All the time

People with OCD will feel the need to use neutralizing thoughts to fight obsessive thoughts. This step may become compulsive but is necessary to counter the negative thoughts that are popping into a person's head. This might include telling themselves that what they are feeling is silly and to try to ignore it. Other times the person might look for a good luck charm that they'll empower mentally to keep obsessive thoughts at bay.
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Do you display any signs of disordered eating?

  • Rarely
  • Often
  • Sometimes

There are many reasons why people experience eating disorders. It could be related to body dysmorphia, or other conditions. Sometimes, peer pressure and exposure to social media can make someone develop an eating disorder. But in some cases, OCD may be the reason behind their eating disorder. If you're changing your eating habits, seek help from a qualified practitioner.
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Do you phone your loved ones all the time to make sure they got to work okay?

  • Yes
  • No
  • Sometimes

There's nothing wrong with people being concerned for their loved ones. But there's a fine line between healthy concern and obsessive concern. In the case of an OCD sufferer, phoning their significant other to check that they got to work safely may become a routine thing because they have this uncontrollable fear that their loved one will get in a car crash, be seriously injured or worse.
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Do you obsess over some things you did a long time ago?

  • Sometimes
  • Never
  • Always

People with OCD often imagine various scenarios in their heads while they're awake. In a lot of cases, they'll recall a memory of something traumatic or embarrassing that happened to them in their lives and relive that moment over and over again. Sometimes, they'll try to change the outcome, which can be better or worse than the original outcome. Regardless of how it turns out, the person will relive this moment so many times in their head that they'll start to think that it actually happen.

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